Envelopes of Nevada

A World of Color, A World of Possibilities

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Q & A

HOW DO I PLACE AN ORDER?

You have several choices. It’s all a matter of what is easiest for you. You can start an order and confirm pricing by calling us toll free at 1-888-EPS-OFNV, or email us as at quotes@epsofnv.com. However, we cannot put an order into “print” until it has been confirmed in writing by mail or fax. You can put orders into production instantly by faxing your orders to us at (702) 644-8061. For accuracy and for your protection, please remember your order MUST be in writing. We CANNOT put verbal orders into production.

HOW DO I WRITE AN ORDER?

To avoid misunderstandings and to save you time and money, please take a few moments to write your purchase order carefully. For example, use item number and description; please don’t write “just like sample” or “same as page 5”. Make clear any unusual spellings, capitols and/or spacing.

HOW DO I CHANGE AN ORDER?

For obvious reasons, requests for changes must be received before your order is received. A phone call to us is your best choice once you put your order in via fax or mail. Should changes be required after your order is placed, the customer assumes all cost for labor and materials incurred up to the time the order is taken out of production. Please note, you will lose your slot in the production run if you change your order!

HOW DO I CANCELL AN ORDER?

We hope this will not happen, but if you do need to cancel an order, you must assume all costs for labor and materials incurred prior to the time of cancellation. Please telephone us for immediate results, then please follow up with a written fax confirming your telephone conversation; please reference your purchase order number when canceling your order.

HOW DO I GET A PROOF?

When you send us clean camera ready copy or electronic files and a proper purchase order, proofs are usually not necessary. However, proofs are available should you desire one, and please state this request on your purchase order. Please note color proofs for four-color process jobs usually have a cost associated with them, please inquire.

AM I ABLE TO RETURN MY ORDER?

It is our policy returned goods will not be accepted without prior authorization from us. Please contact us to discuss your situation.

WHAT ABOUT DEFECTIVE GOODS?

We’re only human, and errors sometimes occur no matter how hard we try to prevent them. If we make a mistake, your order will be credited or re-run without additional charge to you. It’s only fair. However, errors must be reported to us within 10 days after you receive the order. In no case will requests for reruns or credit be honored by us after more than 30 days of receipt of goods.

WHAT ARE MANUFACTURING TOLERANCES?

Because envelopes do vary in size, please allow a tolerance of plus or minus 3/32” for envelopes and window dimensions as well as window placement. Also, please be aware imprint positions may vary.

ARE THERE OVER-RUNS AND/OR UNDER-RUNS?

Standard orders are subject to a 10% over or under. Custom orders of 25,000 and less are subject to a 25% over or under; orders with a quantity of more than 25,000 are subject to a 10% over and under.

WHAT ARE YOUR GENERAL TERMS?

Once we have accepted your order, it will be invoiced at prices in effect at date of acceptance. If we give you a quote and quote number on a standard or special size, plain or printed, that quotation may regarded as firm; provided your order is received within 30 days from the quote date. All prices are subject to available stock. Prices are subject to change without
notice.

DO YOU HAVE CREDIT TERMS?

All initial orders and orders from customers without established credit with Envelopes of Nevada, Inc. are accepted on a PREPAID basis only. For your convenience, we accept American Express, MasterCard and Visa. To establish an open account, we require at least three trade references and once bank reference; please see our credit application. Once credit has been established, terms are Net 30.

DO YOU CHARGE SALES TAX OF ANY KIND?

All quotations and sales are made subject to the buyer assuming any and all local, state or federal taxes on the sales, purchases, delivery, storage, processing, use or transportation of merchandise.

WHAT DOES 4/1 OR 4/4 MEAN?

4/1 means simply four full colors on the front and black on the back. 4/4 refers to four full colors on both the front and back. The first number is always the number of inks on the front of the piece of paper, the second number always refers to the ink colors on the back of the paper. Combinations are only limited by your design and budget.

CAN YOU EXPLAIN HOW “SPOT COLOR” AND “FOUR-COLOR PROCESS” ARE DIFFERENT?

Spot colors are not blends of colors that create other colors but individual colors that can be assigned PMS (Pantone Matching System) numbers. (See the FAQ on PMS for more details) Four-color process creates a wide range of colors using only 4 main colors: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. For this reason, 4-color process is also referred to as CMYK printing.

WHAT IS MEANT BY PAPER GRADE AND WEIGHT?

Paper weight is defined by the weight of 500 standard-sized sheets in pounds. Some examples are listed below:
Bond:  Usually reserved for letterheads, business forms, and quick printing jobs; 16# for forms, 20# for copying, and 24# for stationary.
Text:  A high-quality sheet with a lot of texture. Ranges in weight from 60# to 100#, but the most common weights are 70# or 80#
Uncoated Book: The most common sheet for offset printing; usually 50# to 70# stock.
Coated Book: Glossy sheets that yield vivid colors and excellent reproduction. Generally goes from 30# to 70# for web presses, 60# to 110# for sheet fed.
Cover:  Used for book covers, postcards, and business cards. Coated or uncoated; comes in 60#, 65#, 80# or 100# weights.

WHAT IS MEANT BY COATED AND UNCOATED STOCK?

Uncoated stock is a porous type of paper, and tends to be less expensive. Coated stock has a smooth glossy finish; printing on this type of paper will sharpen your text and graphic layouts. Coated stock, can however, be a bit more expensive.

COVER STOCK, WHAT IS IT?

Cover stock is a term used by paper manufacturers for a heavy paper that is suitable for catalogs, hand outs and brochures. Cover stock can come in a “coated” version which has a smooth surface, or an “uncoated” version in its original rough surface.

WHAT EXACTLY IS A HALFTONE?

A halftone uses a stencil to mimic shading of a color. The halftone is created using patterns of small dots, diamonds, squares, or lines. As you lose focus on the pattern, your eye blends the colors of nearby dots and background to make a new color. Halftones are printed in one color, with shades of that color representing all the colors which made up the original image.

ENVELOPES, WHAT TYPES ARE THERE?

Depending on your needs, you have many options, some are listed below:
1. Business Envelopes: Regular, Window, Booklet, Clasp, and Printed Business.
2. Social & Invitation: Square Flap, Pointed Flap, Black Square, Foil Lined, and Colored Translucent
3. Colored Envelopes: Commercial, Open End, Booklet, Square, and Clasp.
4. Specialty Envelopes: Coin, Full Face Window, Florist, Airmail, and CD envelopes.
5. Shipping and Packaging Envelopes: Paperboard, Tyvek, Corrugated, Bubble, and Plastic

I HEAR DPI SPOKE OF, WHAT EXACTLY IS IT?

DPI simply is an abbreviation for “Dots per Inch.” DPI is a measurement of resolution for page printers, image setting machines and graphics. Web graphics are set at 72 dpi, most printers use artwork that is 300 dpi, and image setting systems can use images up to 1,000 dpi.

WHAT EXACTLY IS A BARONIAL ENVELOPE?

Baronial is a style of envelope that has a large pointed seal flap. This style envelope is usually close to being square and its most common usage is for greeting cards or announcements.

ARE THERE COMMON SIZES FOR ENVELOPES?

Yes there are. Commercial business envelopes sizes are often referred to by a number such as #9 or #10. The chart below lists most common types used today. The #10 envelope is the most common and what is used for most forms of correspondence and letterhead

Size Width x Length
#6 1/4 3 1/2″ x 6″
#6 3/4 3 5/8 x 6 1/2″
#7 3 3/4″ x 6 3/4″
#7 3/4 3 7/8″ x 7 1/2″
#8 5/8 3 5/8″ x 8 5/8″
#9 3 7/8″ x 8 7/8″
#10 4 1/8″ x 9 1/2″
#11 4 1/2″ x 10 3/8″
#12 4 3/4″ x 11″
#14 5″ x 11 1/2″

WHAT IS CAMERA READY ART?
Camera ready art is a high quality black and white print (300 dpi) that is ready to be scanned or shot with a camera to produce a negative for the printing press.

IS THERE A STANDARD WINDOW MEASUREMENT, IF SO, WHAT IS IT?

There seems to be a standard for everything, and envelopes are no different. The window in most commercial business envelopes is 1-1/8” high x 4-1/2” wide.

SPEAKING OF STANDARDS, ARE THERE STANDARD ENVELOPE WEIGHTS?

The standard envelope weights are shown below:
20 lb. Envelopes are used for commercial purposes where strength and opacity is not a factor.
24 lb. Envelopes are used for most letterhead envelopes, and for catalog and booklet envelopes..
28 lb. Envelopes are used for mostly catalog and booklet envelopes; sizes such as 6” x 9”, 9” x 12” and10x13 are just a few examples.
32 lb. Envelopes are used for heavy duty envelopes and clasp envelopes.

WHAT IS A “BLEED”?

A “bleed” simply means the color runs off the printed page. Normally in printing, the ink stays on the surface of the media and does not get printed off the edge. However, in a bleed, the ink/image continues off the page for a unique effect. Bleeds generally cost more since more ink is used due to a larger printing area. In order to achieve some bleed effects, your printed piece will need to be cut down to final size and this adds to the cost also.

PMS NUMBER: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

PMS is short for The Pantone Matching System, and is the standard color matching system used by the printing industry to print specific colors. A PMS match book is a book of color samples and each PMS color has its own name or number that helps you make sure that your colors are the same each time you print, regardless of if you change printing companies.